Archive for December, 2011

December 30, 2011

Real Runway Shows Don’t Require You To Sell Tickets

Model Paige Morgan wrote a nifty Facebook note about why you shouldn’t pay to be in a runway show.  Her thoughts on it, in my opinion, are spot on.  Here’s a excerpt:

Anything that requires you to sell tickets to walk runway is not a good look for a serious portfolio. Here’s why:

1. They have no standards, by and large, because they’re looking for anyone whom will make them money and sell the tickets, not the most qualified models for the task at hand.

2. Any event that’s using anyone whom agrees to model/sell tickets most likely not going to attract the sort of people whom make good connections or networking possibilities for future work, as most of the people are not qualified/experienced potential models, so the working professional photographers/MUA/Stylists are not going to attend. (Aside from whomever the event promoters hired to be there for the purpose of the show running at all)

 3. If the company/ event will give you such great “exposure” or contacts, why would they need models to hawk seats to cover their production costs? Why do you have to pay for the supposed benefits via ticket sales? The short answer is they are probably making empty promises about what they are able to do for you. They can’t even make their own events break even without using models as unpaid sales/promotional labor, let alone promote you effectively.

4. Let’s say you didn’t notice points 1, 2 and 3. You sell the tickets, walk the show, and list it as a credit on your resume, along with your new flyer/press kit/whatever the fuck.

It won’t matter to your next potential client, as you didn’t get there by being the best possible choice for the job. You bought and paid for your catwalk turn, which anyone with a spare 20 friends and some available cash could’ve done.  Take the $200 you would’ve forced your loved ones to spend and/or paid out of pocket and put it toward things that will actually benefit you and your career.

And here’s a link to the full note.

I highly suggest reading what Paige has to say about companies like Raw:Artists, FUZE IT WORLDWIDE, and Icon, who require models to, essentially, pay to walk in their shows.  Especially read her note if you’ve been contacted by one of these companies (or one asking similarly of you) and accepted into one of their shows.

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December 15, 2011

Some thoughts on rejection & criticism.

Maybe my art background and my making my living as a graphic designer has helped me with this, but since I’ve been modeling, I’ve never taken rejection and criticism personally. In fact, you can’t.

Sure, modeling can be raw and real–there are some gigs that are extremely emotionally and physically draining.  And don’t get me wrong, near constant rejection and criticism can be emotionally draining as well.  But if you’re taking it all personally, you’re doing it wrong.

Rejection is the first thing you need to learn how to handle as a model, because it’s what you’ll be faced with the most.

Being a model is all about your look. Your measurements and height, your eye color, hair color and length, your body type, the size of your tits, your skintone, your bone structure… even your flexibility–all of that is extremely important when it comes to modeling. Most of it you can’t change either (yay, genetics) so taking rejection personally is silly. Sure, you can cut and dye your hair or get wigs, get breast implants, buy some colored contacts, tan… you get the idea.  You can spend all the money in the world to change your looks, but even if you do all that, you’ll find that there are still photographers and clients out there that don’t like your look and won’t book you. You can’t please everyone, and if you take every rejection or criticism personally, you’re going to wind up being really depressed and bitter, and you’ll burn out super fast.  Plus, no one will want to work with you because you’ll be a total drama queen about every little thing people say to you too, which no one likes!

Your best bet (and photographers can learn from this too) is to let the rejections roll off your back and keep working to find someone who likes your look. They’re out there! It might be a challenging road, but if you’re up for it, you’ll find what you’re looking for. Just have fun while looking and it won’t be as hard of a search.

Use the criticism you get along the way to grow.  Learn from what people tell you, but don’t let it get to you.  Modeling and photography is a creative industry, and critics come with it.  It’s just how it is, and it will always be that way.  I’ve written about criticism before, but it was a slightly different take on it… though if you haven’t read that entry, it might help make this next part make more sense.

Someone being constructive and offering a critique (especially after you ask for one) is typically being helpful and offering advice, which should be considered.  If someone tells you something you don’t like hearing, take a deep breath and ask yourself “that’s their opinion and I don’t have to agree, but is there something I can take away from what they said to make myself better?”. Don’t take every critic’s words as an attack, because usually, that’s not what they’re doing.  Think about what’s being said and choose to take the advice and learn from it, or not.  It’s up to you.

Those who offer unsolicited critiques of your work should most definitely not be taken personally.  But those critiques might also be worth listening to.  Consider the source when the critique is unsolicited and realize that sometimes an unsolicited critique should be taken with a grain of salt.  Say “thanks for the advice” and (again) choose whether or not you want to take it to heart.

Those who shit all over your work and are stupid and negative and tell you everything they think you did wrong should be ignored, especially if it’s unsolicited.  Haters gonna hate, no matter what you do.  Learn to laugh at the bitter people who have nothing better to do with their time than hate on your work.  It’ll make your life a lot easier.

December 7, 2011

Hiatus.

I’m on indefinite hiatus from modeling.

I’m most definitely not shooting until January, but am not sure when I’ll get in front of the camera again.  I’m crazy busy, and I’m waiting for a piercing to fully heal.

I will still be blogging over at Suburban Style Challenge and active on FaceBook.  Not sure if I’ll pick back up here regularly or not… I’ve been rather uninspired to write here lately, to be honest.

Oh, and I’m judging this awesome event with Raw Talent Clothing Co and Gonzo Photos on January 20.  You should check it out (I’ll post a separate entry about it later on).

Do you really want to shoot with me after the holidays? Well, money talks. My rates are $50/hour for modeling and $25/hour for pose coaching (which I’ll be available for after New Year’s).  Feel free to email me to set something up booking@modelracheljay.com.

December 5, 2011

A Good Read: Inspiration vs. Imitation

A friend sent me this article and I thought it’d be a good one to share with my readers here, though it was written in reference to the design community.  Modeling and photography certainly deals with both inspiration and imitation, especially when we’re in the beginning stages of things.  The author of this article, Jessica, does a very good job explaining things to her audience (which she notes as aspiring artists and designers), I think.  So check it out.

Inspiration vs. Imitation

Enjoy.

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