Posts tagged ‘emotions’

October 8, 2010

Must Read: Memoirs of a Bullied Kid

Many models tell stories of how they were awkward kids, didn’t fit in, grew up ugly ducklings, and never thought they were pretty.  Some even had bad acne, were overweight, or otherwise were considered “ugly” by peers.  Most certainly, they dealt with being made fun of.

But besides that, many of us have dealt with bullying.  We’ve spent time wallowing in self-loathing, and we’ve dealt with plain just not fitting in, at one point in our lives or another.

And that is why this article is worth a read.

http://www.danoah.com/2010/10/memoirs-of-bullied-kid.html

Oh, and this one’s worth a read too.

http://www.danoah.com/2010/09/disease-called-perfection.html

July 2, 2010

What do you practice in front of a mirror?

Models say it all that time.  Many photographers do too.  “Practice in front of a mirror.”  But what, exactly, is a model supposed to practice in front of a mirror?

Practice moving in general and expressions.  Study your body and watch how it moves, both nude (or in a bra and panties) and clothed, so you can see what happens to your skin as you move, and to the clothes as you move.  Watch what your body does as you move, and as you stop moving.  Sure, it’s not perfect, but it’s far better than not knowing your body and its movements at all.

Same goes for your face.  Sit in front of the mirror and make faces at yourself.  Walk yourself thru emotions (get a list if it helps) and think of situations you might feel those emotions in.  Use personal experiences as a guide.  For example, remember how you felt when your childhood pet died, think of the first time you got flowers from a boyfriend, or what went through your head during your first car accident.  Study how your face moves through each expression, and what happens to it when it stops on each one. Again, it’s not perfect, but it’s better than nothing.

A model would also benefit from taking dance, yoga, martial arts, acting classes, or any other kind of class that either teaches you how to move (and be aware of your body) or how to emote.

Using it on shoots…

Take what you’ve learned from studying yourself (and from any experience you have, both from a body-movement aspect and from a personal-experience aspect) and use that when you model.  You flow from pose to pose, expression to expression, and alter what you do based on feedback from the photographer/art director.

It’s not something a new model can do right off the bat, usually (some dancers are almost natural posers).  It takes a lot of practice, a lot of patience, and a lot of time to learn.

If you’re a photographer working with a lot of new models, I usually suggest scrapping the traditional pose book (mostly ’cause most of them blow) and make your own.  Take photos you like the poses in, print them out or tear them out of magazines and catalogs, and put them in a 3-ring binder.  Categorize them if you like–fashion poses, glamour, art nudes, commercial/lifestyle–to make it easier to dig through.  Keep that book on hand at all times, and reference it.  Show the model you’re working with what you want her to do, and verbally make adjustments as you go.  You’ll be more likely to get poses you like (instead of stuffy, fake, senior-portrait poses) and you’ll be happier all around.

Here’s a bunch of modeling-related links (articles, videos, whatever) that you may find helpful. If you have anything you’d like me to add to the list, feel free to drop me a line.  Modeling Articles & Videos

October 8, 2009

Breast Cancer Awareness Poster For Sale!

The AG3 Breast Cancer Awareness poster is finished!!

100% of the proceeds from the poster will be going to the Susan G. Komen foundation.  It’s only $15 for a 24×36″ poster!  Here’s a tiny sneak peek 😉

Check it out, and buy, here!

August 21, 2009

Today’s Public Service Annoucement

Models, if you’re struggling with posing and expressions, and can’t get through a shoot without “freezing up” because you’re so nervous, then chances are you shouldn’t be asking to get paid.  It might also be wise to

Typically*, photographers pay models that have something to offer them (when they’re hiring models for things like private projects and portfolio building–when it’s a client that pays, this may be a different story).  Chances are, if they hire a model who’s nervous and constantly gets stuck posing/emoting, and ultimately has one look and a handful of stiff poses, they’re going to feel a bit short-changed at the end of the day.

Just some food for thought.

*Note: I did say typically.  Some photographers do hire based on things like looks and measurements before they hire based on experience.  But many feel that a model needs to have something worth paying for in order to be, well, paid.

October 20, 2008

Expression

Emoting on a shoot, especially if you’re a new model, can be tough. Often times, a model can end up with a portfolio full of “deer in headlights” shots. Not good. But, with a little work, a model can improve her expressions and produce images that a dramatically different. Acting classes may also help. But, for those DIYers out there, here are some tips for improving your expressions.

To work on your expressions, use a mirror and work on conveying emotions (search the internet for a list if you think that will help you). Try to remember what you did, and what you thought of, to move your face a certain way (much like how you make mental notes of how you got into a pose, when practicing poses in the mirror). You can also find images you like and work to duplicate the expressions in those shots. Again, practice in the mirror, and do so often.

You can also ask a photographer to help guide you towards emotions. For some people, a simple “you’re angry” works. For others, a story works… like “you’ve just walked in on you best friend making out with your boyfriend, and she’s wearing a shirt she borrowed from you!” And don’t be afraid to talk and act natural during a shoot. Sometimes, the candids that result can be the best shots!

One site that’s worth a look at (even if it’s just for a laugh) is www.emotioneric.com.

%d bloggers like this: